Encourage Teens to Work Out for Better Learning

Originally published June 7, 2019 in Health Day.

By Len Canter

Exercise is important for all kids, because it boosts their overall health and wards off excess weight. But it holds added benefit for teens: According to a study in The Journal of Pediatrics, it improves their attention, which can help them do better in school.

The greatest payoff came from about an hour a day of moderate-to-vigorous activity, the study found. It seems that sustained exercise at a moderate level releases a specific protein that improves numerous brain functions. But overly vigorous activity could make teens too tired to focus on learning. Read More

How can physical activity help a child do better in school?

Originally published Nov. 5, 2018 by BBC Sport.

By Andy Daly-Smith

Did you know that children are expected to achieve 60 minutes of health-enhancing physical activity every day, 30 minutes of which should occur during school?

Only one in ten achieve the in-school target; only one in five achieve the whole-day target, with many spending at least nine hours sitting every day. Read More

When kids run for 15 minutes in school every day, here’s what happens

Originally published May 10, 2018 by theconversation.com.

By Colin Moran, Naomi Brooks, Ross Chesham

If you haven’t heard of the Daily Mile yet, your time has come. Now taking place in 3,600 primary schools each day in 35 countries around the world, it takes children outside during normal lesson time to run or walk laps of the playground for 15 minutes. The ones who run cover around a mile each day.

The initiative has an endearing back story. It was developed six years ago by St Ninians Primary School in Stirling in central Scotland after children and teachers felt the pupils needed to be fitter. Read More