Students Learn Heart Rate Training Management with PE Technology

Teachers Use Fitness Data From Heart Rate Monitors To Educate Students on Management of All Fitness Levels

Physical education teachers use heart rate technology to show students how hard they need to exercise in class to positively impact their fitness levels.

A 24-year teaching veteran, River Rock (Wisc.) Intermediate School PE teacher Jackie Clark has always made it a priority to include the latest technology in her classes. She started with pedometers 15 years ago but knew they couldn’t give her – and especially her students – a full picture of how effective a workout was. While her students grasped the importance of activity, Clark wanted to give them a greater understanding of moving at an elevated heart rate. Read More

Fitness Friday

Fitness Friday PE Lesson Helps Students Grow HIIT Exercise Skills

Students Make Most of Class Workout Time to Improve Cardiovascular Fitness

What started as a health teacher’s mission to add more personalized physical activity to her students’ day has grown into a popular, fitness-enhancing finish to the school week.

“I knew I needed to get these kids more active than they actually were,” said Hampstead (New Hampshire) Middle School health teacher Kate Muskrat. “So I started bringing my health group down and joining the physical education classes on Fridays.”

The joint Friday sessions evolved into weekly high-intensity interval training sessions that include 75 percent of the school’s students. High-intensity interval training is considered one of the most time-efficient ways to exercise, a key factor for teachers with limited class time to develop impactful workouts. Studies also show that by exercising at maximum intensity in shorter bursts, students improve their oxygen consumption while lowering resting heart rate and blood pressure. Read More

Following teacher’s favorite activity, students pedal their way to improved fitness

By relating daily health lessons to her favorite activity, a Colorado teacher is developing heart rate training life skills for students in her middle school health class.

“Even though I’m in the health classroom, I’m constantly bringing in who I am and what I do and trying to set an example that these kids can buy into and continue with for the rest of their lives,” said Fort Lupton (Colo.) Middle School teacher Lindsay Yost.

When not in a gym or health classroom, Yost races mountain bikes – she won the 2013 U.S. Downhill National Championship – and coaches downhill riders during the summers. A former college heptathlete, Yost fuels her passion for exercise by focusing on her heart rate, both on her bike and in the gym. By teaching students what motivates her to remain active, she’s found an improved sense of motivation from her students when they exercise. Read More

frisbee fitness

Fast-paced, frisbee fitness PE lesson elevates student heart rate

Childhood favorite finds new purpose in Spirit Challenge-winning activity

By adding a new twist to a backyard game, Portland (Mich.) High School physical education students push themselves to exercise in a healthy fitness zone by re-connecting them with what many high schoolers consider a childhood past-time: the frisbee.

Portland P.E. teacher Andy Pulling’s Fun Frisbee Fitness lesson keeps students moving, uses national standards, can be duplicated at any grade level and teaches the importance of teamwork along with fitness. Pulling’s lesson ranked as one of six winning submissions in last fall’s IHT Spirit Video Challenge powered by adidas, and his superstar lesson is the March adidas Lesson for IHT Spirit.

“It’s just a kids’ toy at the secondary level,” Pulling said. “But when we teach them how to play ultimate frisbee or do frisbee golf, it’s kind of like their youthful excitement comes back to life.” Read More

recovery heart rate

Skyline HS teaches recovery heart rate, improves PE student fitness

Physical education students at Skyline High School (Issaquah School District 411, Washington) utilize heart rate monitors to concentrate on lowering their recovery heart rate.

Four times each semester, students in P.E. teacher Tracy Schellberg’s classes set off on a 12-minute run. Students check their heart rate immediately after the 12 minutes, then rest for two minutes before taking their heart rate again. It’s something she’s been studying for five years, getting the results she desires both for program validation and, more importantly, student health.

“Last semester, 80 percent of my students were able to drop their recovery heart rate to 120 beats per minute or less,” Schellberg said last month. “There was a steady improvement from the first assessment to the last.” Read More