exercise at an elevated heart rate

Students Improve Longevity and Academic Readiness Through Exercise at an Elevated Heart Rate

Research Correlates Exercise at an Elevated Heart Rate to Benefits that Include Improved Cognitive Performance

IHT designed the Spirit System to focus students on minutes of exercise at an elevated heart rate because academic research shows conclusively that exercise at an elevated heart rate correlates to increased longevity, improved cognitive performance, and self-regulation and classroom functioning among children.

There are different philosophies about the key fitness metrics in evaluating fitness activities such as step counts, time to run a given distance, calories burned, and minutes of elevated heart rate. Our philosophy of focusing on minutes of elevated heart rate aligns with the Center for Disease Control’s 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans1 standards which recommend:

  • “children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years should have 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of physical activity each day” and
  • “most of the 60 or more minutes a day should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity and should include vigorous-intensity physical activity at least 3 days a week.”

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exercise at an elevated heart rate

Students’ Positive Experiences in PE Linked to Healthy Fitness Habits as Adults

Creating Positive, Engaging Memories Essential After Study Links Negative Experiences with Sedentary Adult Behavior

New research details how students’ perception of their PE experience in school correlates to their level of healthy activities as adults. The IHT Spirit heart rate training system helps teachers create positive experiences in PE by giving students objective assessment of progress towards goals that empowers students to self-manage their fitness.

Earlier this year, the American College of Sports Medicine published a study conducted by Matthew A. Ladwig, Spyridoula Vazou, and Panteleimon Ekkekakis that links sedentary behavior in adults to negative memories of their physical education classes. Read More

FUTP60

Use FUTP60 to Deliver PE Heart Rate Monitors, Training to Classes

Application Deadline for Popular Fitness, Nutrition Grant Approaches; Take Opportunity to Introduce Technology that Improves Student Engagement, Achievement in PE

Teachers wanting to add IHT’s PE heart rate monitors to their curriculum have until Nov. 7, 2018 to apply for $4,000 grants available from the NFL’s Fuel Up To Play 60 program.

The Fuel Up to Play 60 grant awards winning applicants $4,000 that must be split evenly on initiatives that will help students with healthy eating and physical fitness. Teachers can use the physical fitness funding to add new technology such as the IHT Spirit System, which uses data from the wrist-based IHT ZONE heart rate monitor to help students take a direct role in learning lifelong fitness skills. Read More

activity

Morning Exercise Prepares Oskaloosa Students for Academic Success

Twenty-Minute Session Primes Students for Math and Literacy Blocks, Boosts Activity Time for Incoming Sixth-Graders

To remedy the activity gap between the sixth-graders and the older students at Oskaloosa (Iowa) Middle School, PE teacher Betsy Luck worked with colleagues and school leadership to develop a program to prepare students for their toughest classes with 20 minutes of physical activity every morning.

Luck spent part of her summer vacation studying the 15-minute mile principle published as part of “The Daily Mile,” a British program that encourages students to run or walk for at least a mile as a break in their academic day. After studying the program, Luck thought a similar program would work well at the start of her school’s day, for several reasons. Read More

PE heart rate monitors

PE Heart Rate Monitors Nurture a Passion for Activity in Young Students

Teacher Uses Technology to Encourage Students to Exercise at Elevated Heart Rates to Build Essential Healthy Habits

By giving his students an early introduction to PE heart rate monitors, David Kober wants to nurture their passion for activity and develop heart rate training skills that will help students lead healthy lifestyles.

“Our community isn’t always as active and healthy as it needs to be,” Kober said. “I want to teach the students how to be healthy and why it’s important to be healthy. As they get older, this is just something they need to know to stay healthy.” Read More