Even mild physical activity immediately improves memory function, UCI-led study finds

Originally published Sept. 24, 2018 by Eureka Alert and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

People who include a little yoga or tai chi in their day may be more likely to remember where they put their keys. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and Japan’s University of Tsukuba found that even very light workouts can increase the connectivity between parts of the brain responsible for memory formation and storage.

In a study of 36 healthy young adults, the researchers discovered that a single 10-minute period of mild exertion can yield considerable cognitive benefits. Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, the team examined subjects’ brains shortly after exercise sessions and saw better connectivity between the hippocampal dentate gyrus and cortical areas linked to detailed memory processing. Read More

Dynamic PE course

Dynamic PE Course at Pomperaug High School Honored

Originally published Oct. 5, 2018 in the Southbury Patch.

The course was developed with the intention of assisting students who are struggling in school through physical activity.

The Connecticut Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CTAHPERD) has awarded the “Dynamic Physical Education” course at Pomperaug High School (PHS) as an outstanding program.

Danielle McCauley, a Physical Education teacher at PHS, wrote the curriculum and syllabus for the dynamic PE course. The course was developed with the intention of assisting students who are struggling in school through physical activity, with a conscious effort toward developing a growth mindset and sense of mindfulness to improve calmness and focus through yoga and meditation. Read More

physical education

Physical education class every day

Originally published Oct. 4, 2018 in the Charlevoix Courier.

Editors note: The following letter to the editor is from a fifth-grade student at Charlevoix Elementary School. Each week the Charlevoix Courier will feature one of the 19 student essay submissions from Charlevoix Elementary School teacher Dawn Hovie and run it on our opinion page.

Editor:

I think there should be physical education class every day in school for at least one hour a day because kids need exercise every day. Maybe the kid has a lot of chores to do at home, lives in an apartment, or the city and they do not have a chance to get outside easily to run around and play. Daily gym classes would give those kids the opportunity to get the recommended 60 minutes of exercise a day.

It has been proven that kids who go to P.E. do better in their classes that day than if they didn’t have P.E. This is because it allows the kids to work out extra energy and have the ability to focus more on their schoolwork. If kids have P.E. every day of the school week they would do better in classes all week. Having P.E. in the early afternoon helps to work out any remaining extra energy allowing for more focus the rest of the day.

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Action research: Physical activity and student writing

Originally published Sept. 24, 2018 in Teacher Magazine.

By Leah Carter and Hugo Engele

Leah Carter (Assistant Head of English) and Hugo Engele (Director of Co-Curricula) are undertaking a two-year action research project at St Aloysius College, Kirribilli, to investigate the impact of physical activity on student writing ability. Here, they share the research aims and what has happened so far.

The pressure on schools to achieve academic results is ever increasing. Is there a space for physicality and creativity at the centre of our complex, cut-throat and dynamic educational climate? Can we foster academic achievement whilst also valuing the things that we know will make our students happy and healthy? Read More

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Morning Exercise Prepares Oskaloosa Students for Academic Success

Twenty-Minute Session Primes Students for Math and Literacy Blocks, Boosts Activity Time for Incoming Sixth-Graders

To remedy the activity gap between the sixth-graders and the older students at Oskaloosa (Iowa) Middle School, PE teacher Betsy Luck worked with colleagues and school leadership to develop a program to prepare students for their toughest classes with 20 minutes of physical activity every morning.

Luck spent part of her summer vacation studying the 15-minute mile principle published as part of “The Daily Mile,” a British program that encourages students to run or walk for at least a mile as a break in their academic day. After studying the program, Luck thought a similar program would work well at the start of her school’s day, for several reasons. Read More