Social/Emotional Learning

Social/Emotional Learning Resonates In Students’ Cycling Workout

Improved Cardiovascular Fitness Brings Additional Social/Emotional Learning and Academic Benefits as Students Take Part in PE Cycling Unit

By improving their cardiovascular fitness through a new physical education cycling unit, students are also boosting their Social/Emotional Learning wellness.

“The focus is mostly on cardio fitness first,” said Portage Central Middle School (Portage, Mich.) PE teacher John Dunlop. “We want to learn what you get out of certain types of workouts. There’s physical fitness and then there’s emotional and social fitness that also needs to be considered.”

Dunlop and Portland High School (Portland, Mich.) PE teacher Andy Pulling each won Riding For Focus Grants from the Specialized Foundation for the 2017-18 school year. The grants provided each teacher with a fleet of bicycles and helmets along with a curriculum designed to teach fitness through cycling.  In the program’s early stages, the teachers see improvements in other areas as well.

“[Along with] Specialized [we] want to prove that cycling will increase student focus and therefore have improvement in academic and personal fitness,” Pulling said. “You can absolutely see the psychological and social impact from day to day.”

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monitors

Heart rate monitors get students ‘in the zone’ as more schools add them to curriculum

Originally published Jan. 26, 2018 in the Omaha World-Herald.

By Kelsey Stewart, World-Herald Staff Writer

Gabbi Zuerlein stepped up to one of the five squares of turf placed on the gym floor.

Golf club in hand, she lined up her chip shot. The 15-year-old sent 10 neon golf balls sailing across the gym. After retrieving her shots, she hopped into a two-person conga line and let other students have their turn with golf.

It’s important that the high school sophomore and her classmates don’t stop moving during physical education classes. If they do, the heart rate monitors they wear on their wrists will reflect that later.

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heart

Heart rate monitors help teachers drive home intrinsic habits

As wearable devices become more and more prevalent, companies use different metrics to track activity and rate workouts. While steps and calories remain two of the most prevalent focuses in the consumer marketplace, teachers focus on minutes of exercise at an elevated heart rate to develop healthy habits in their students.

“I focus on heart rate,” said Riverton, Wyoming physical education teacher Mike Bradley. “If you get your heart rate up often enough, then you’re helping your overall health and fitness. I can walk 10,000 steps in a day without getting my heart rate up. We have to get our heart rates up for those steps to really benefit us.”

heart
Teachers work with students to explain the benefit of wearing a heart rate monitor while exercising and understanding what the monitor shows.

The Center For Disease Control recommends that children and adolescents between ages six and 17 should have at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Interactive Health Technologies, which teamed with adidas to develop an education-focused heart rate monitor and assessment system, believes that teaching children how to elevate their heart rate during that daily activity is paramount to teaching healthy habits. People of all ages see the biggest health benefit from exercising at an elevated heart rate. Read More

Pine

Program uses heart rate monitors to track and motivate students

Originally published Nov. 21, 2017 by KOLO-TV, Reno.

During P.E. Tuesday morning, you can tell the seventh graders in the gym at Pine Middle School are working hard. And they can tell, too, because some of them are wearing something on their wrists that let them know their level of exertion.

“I call it a heart rate monitor,” says Malia Miles, a seventh-grade student at the school.

Miles is one of the students at the middle school participating in a pilot program. She gets to borrow the wrist heart monitors twice a week during P.E. as she tries to get her heart rate up for at least 20 minutes. Read More

heart rate training

How to Utilize Heart Rate Training For a More Efficient Workout

Originally published June 27, 2017 by Fitness Formula Clubs.

By Tyler Sutphen, FFC Union Station Personal Trainer

Whether you are spending time on the treadmill or time hitting the weights, chances are you might not be using that time as effectively as you could be. Time is of the essence, so let’s get right into it.

heart rate trainingMost exercise routines you see online do not take into account your heart rate during each training session. Most likely, they state something to the effect of doing 30 minutes to an hour on some piece of cardio equipment and a basic strength program stating you should rest for 30 seconds between each set. Read More