fitness time

In response to research, schools boost physical fitness time

Originally published Feb. 26, 2018 by Education Dive.

By Amelia Harper

Schools are paying more attention to the need to include physical fitness as experts like Charles Hillman, an advisor to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, say that evidence of the connection between fitness and brain function has mounted steadily over the years, according to the Hechinger Report.

In 2015, only 27% of high school students were getting the recommended number of minutes of daily exercise, and girls, Hispanic students, and black students received less exercise than white students, according to data from Child Trends.

Some school districts are trying new physical education approaches that are reaping results. In Fort Worth, for example, a school switched to four 15-minute periods of recess per day instead of one 20 minute session and saw a 25% to 35% decrease in off-task behaviors. And in Wisconsin, the state education department is now overseeing a program called Core 4+ (or “active kids, active classrooms) that features interventions to increase movement during the school day. Read More

For This Champion for Student Health, P.E. Extends Beyond the Gym

Originally published Feb. 21, 2018 by Education Week.

By Evie Blad

There’s an outdated stereotype of physical education classes that Judy LoBianco has spent her 25-year career fighting against.

It’s one where the most athletic students flaunt their skills while their less capable peers struggle to keep up.

It’s one where learning stops after students leave the gym and where P.E. teachers don’t have a seat at the table with their colleagues who teach core subjects, like math and English. Read More

School’s focus on student fitness contributes to academic successes

Data from student-worn heart rate monitors and research about the positive impact physical education has on academic success convinced an IDEA Public Schools principal to make sure students who need academic support don’t get it at the expense of exercise and fitness.

“‘You will no longer take kids out of PE for academic intervention until they have had at least 30 minutes in P.E. utilizing the monitors,’” mandated IDEA Monterrey Park principal Curtis Lawrence.

IDEA students wear the adidas Zone for IHT Spirit wrist heart rate monitors during physical education and strive to exercise at an elevated heart rate for as long as they can during class or activity breaks. Students can see in real time if they are improving their fitness by exercising in the target heart rate zone (yellow for moderate to vigorous activity; red for vigorous activity) by the color displayed on the heart rate monitor. Read More

minutes

MCPS Teachers Champion Bill To Boost Elementary School P.E. Curriculum

Originally published Feb. 8, 2018 in Bethesda Magazine.

BY BETHANY RODGERS

Matt Slatkin and Shannon Spencer, two physical education teachers at Newport Mill Middle School in Kensington, are heading to Annapolis to lobby for more student exercise.

Not for the middle-schoolers they teach, but for the students who haven’t yet arrived.

“We get them after elementary school. We would love to get them in better shape,” Spencer said.

Read More

study

PE is a more important school subject than history, British study finds

Originally published Feb. 15, 2018 in The Telegraph.

By Helena Horton

The British public thinks it is more important secondary school children have PE lessons than study history, according to a study by YouGov.

The survey asked British adults which subjects they felt were the most important to study in schools, and physical education ranked more highly than many other subjects, including history and religious education.

Out of 1,648 respondents, 42 percent ranked PE as very important, compared to 39 percent who think history is very important and 12 percent for religious studies.

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