ESSA

More Than School Safety: What the Huge Hike for ESSA’s Block Grant Means

Originally published March 22, 2018 by Education Week.

By Alyson Klein

As part of a massive new spending bill, lawmakers are poised to provide $1.1 billion in aid that congressional aides say will help boost school safety and mental-health resources in the wake of the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last month.

The money is intended “to expand school-based mental health services and supports; for bullying prevention; and for professional development for personnel in crisis management and school-based violence prevention strategies,” according to a House fact sheet.

But the increase isn’t just good news for school safety and counseling programs. It also being cheered by everyone from advocates for music education to fans of dual enrollment programs. Read More

funding

5 Places to Seek out Funding for P.E.

From direct budget allocations to accessing federal funding, educators look anywhere they can to obtain funding for their physical education programs. Here are five success stories of teachers and administrators finding funding to purchase heart rate technology for their physical education program.

School District budget

In West Des Moines, Iowa, Brian Rhoads found funding in the district’s curriculum budget. As a physical education teacher-turned-administrator, he knew that the funding existed but that P.E. had missed out on it for several cycles. He drafted a data-rich proposal to implement heart rate monitors into the district’s P.E. curriculum and the administration granted the funding.

“Physical education has been left out of those funds for many years – no one knew to ask for it,” he said. “Well, I asked for it. It was perfect timing because we were in our curriculum adoption process, so the district simply allocated what we needed. A lot of money has gone unused because people weren’t tapping into it.” Read More

ESSA

ESSA drives new approaches to K12 physical education

Originally published Dec. 20, 2017 by District Administration.

By Ray Bendici District Administration, January 2018

School districts are elevating physical education standards and expanding athletic activities beyond traditional sports to provide a more well-rounded education as required by the Every Student Succeeds Act.

Instead of old favorites such as dodgeball and basketball, many districts have introduced more individually focused activities such as rock climbing, cross-training and yoga.

“We are seeing new physical education now because the ultimate goal is to prepare students to be active and healthy for a lifetime,” says Carly Wright, senior manager of advocacy for SHAPE America, the Society of Health and Physical Educators.

Read More

ESSA

ESSA takes center stage as new school year approaches

July 27, 2017 – A new era begins next month as the U.S. Department of Education focuses on a more well-rounded approach to student development under the Every Student Succeeds Act. 

ESSA becomes the nation’s public education standard with the arrival of the 2017-18 school year. Educators have one eye trained on ESSA’s implementation, the other on Congress as it deliberates over the DoE’s 2017-28 budget.

Before federal funding is passed down, the DoE must review and accept each state’s education plan. A key element to states’ plans will be an explanation detailing how local districts will develop data to prove schools will deliver programs that fully prepare students for success both in college and their postgraduate careers. Read More

ESSA

How ESSA impacts PE funding

Aug. 3, 2016

Physical Education teachers and administrators across the country rejoiced when President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act into law last December.

ESSA
The Champion Initiative’s Kathleen Satterley discusses how the Every Student Succeeds Act will make funding for programs including physical education available to schools in the future at IHT’s Advisory and Innovation Summit.

ESSA replaces the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act, which focused primarily on improving student proficiency in math and reading. As a result, schools struggled to fund and emphasize other areas of education including physical education, art and music, as detailed in this 2005 report, and another from 2013. Read More