exercise intensity

PE Study Finds Gap in Homeschoolers’ View of Exercise Intensity

‘Posters on the Hill’ winner teaches students how to accurately assess their effort, improve exercise intensity levels with PE heart rate technology

A student research project recognized by the Council for Undergraduate Research demonstrated how physical education heart rate technology gave homeschool students a more accurate picture of their fitness levels by showing the differences between their perceived and actual exertion levels.

Danielle Tilley, a third-year education student at the University of Nebraska-Kearney, earned a trip to Washington, D.C. when her research project was selected as one of 60 winners in the Council for Undergraduate Research’s 2018 “Posters on the Hill” contest. More than 400 students submitted their projects. Of the winners, only three posters focused on education, and only Tilley studied physical education. Read More

data

Data Enables Teachers to Assess PE Performance, Reinforce Lessons

By removing opinion-based physical education assessment, technology helps teachers deliver meaningful, immediate feedback to students and program-wide data to administrators.

Teachers using the IHT Spirit System P.E. assessment software no longer have to guess about which students worked hard to meet daily goals. The adidas Zone for IHT Spirit wrist heart rate monitors, worn by students during P.E. class, record the students’ heart rate data and then transfers the data to the Spirit System following class.

“The best thing for us is that it gives us a quality way of assessing it, instead of sitting back and kind of saying, ‘well, that student kind of went hard’ or ‘they didn’t go hard’ and poorly assessing P.E.,” said Justin Kinney, a P.E. teacher at Ridge View High School. “We can now assess students adequately in P.E.” Read More

recovery heart rate

Skyline HS teaches recovery heart rate, improves PE student fitness

Physical education students at Skyline High School (Issaquah School District 411, Washington) utilize heart rate monitors to concentrate on lowering their recovery heart rate.

Four times each semester, students in P.E. teacher Tracy Schellberg’s classes set off on a 12-minute run. Students check their heart rate immediately after the 12 minutes, then rest for two minutes before taking their heart rate again. It’s something she’s been studying for five years, getting the results she desires both for program validation and, more importantly, student health.

“Last semester, 80 percent of my students were able to drop their recovery heart rate to 120 beats per minute or less,” Schellberg said last month. “There was a steady improvement from the first assessment to the last.” Read More