CDC researcher: Physical activity one of the most important ways to improve health

Originally published July 27, 2019 by WRVO Public Media.

With much discussion on how sedentary Americans are in the present society, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have created guidelines for activity, all with the message that any exercise is better than none at all.

Dr. John D. Omura, who works in the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity at the CDC in the Physical Activity and Health Branch, spoke with “Take Care” about the CDC and his research. He has helped author several studies relating to exercise, including “Walking as an Opportunity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention,” which he hopes will encourage more Americans to stay active. Read More

Keeping children active outside the classroom once school starts

Originally published Aug. 2, 2019 by KCBD News Channel 11.

By Katie Main

With the beginning of the new school year just around the corner, it is important for parents to know how to keep their children active despite being in the classroom all day.

Melanie Hart, a professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Sport Management at Texas Tech, said during the summer children are really active. Read More

Encourage Teens to Work Out for Better Learning

Originally published June 7, 2019 in Health Day.

By Len Canter

Exercise is important for all kids, because it boosts their overall health and wards off excess weight. But it holds added benefit for teens: According to a study in The Journal of Pediatrics, it improves their attention, which can help them do better in school.

The greatest payoff came from about an hour a day of moderate-to-vigorous activity, the study found. It seems that sustained exercise at a moderate level releases a specific protein that improves numerous brain functions. But overly vigorous activity could make teens too tired to focus on learning. Read More

Want to Stay Young Longer? Science Says This Exercise Makes Your Body Act Like It’s 9 Years Younger

Republished May 18, 2019 by Inc Magazine.

By Bill Murray Jr.

It’s been a dream of civilizations since the dawn of time: If we can’t live forever, can we at least slow down the aging process and stretch our lives out as long as possible?

Now, researchers from Brigham Young University say they’ve found that a certain type of physical exercise can slow the aging process within our cells. That ultimately means better health, and physical conditioning that matches the natural age progression of a significantly younger person–as many as nine years younger. Read More

morning exercise

School Finding Social-Emotional, Academic Benefits from Morning Exercise Programs

Morning Programs Will Use IHT ZONE Heart Rate Monitors to Boost Physical Fitness While Improving Academic Competencies and Connection to School

An early-morning fitness club using IHT ZONE wrist heart rate monitors helps elementary students stay on task throughout the day.

Goose Bay Elementary School (Wasilla, Alaska) PE teacher Nancy Blake has overseen her school’s Early Morning Movers program, which uses exercise to push them to reach their target heart rate zones. Her goal is to send them into the school day invigorated and ready to learn. Read More